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Arunachal heading for Bloodbath

Go back foreigners. Go back Chakmas. Go back Tibetans. The lush green hills girding Itanagar reverbrated with the echoes of full throated slogans shouted by thousands of indigenous Arunachalis. The date was Saturday, September 24. The occasion, a public rally organised by the All Arunachal Pradesh Students’ Union (AAPSU) – the last in a series of five held in different parts of the state to press for the repatriation or deportation of an estimated 200,000 refugees and illegal immigrants who began settling in Arrunachal – India’s ‘Land of the Rising Sun’ – since 1944. Now the refugees – Chakmas from the Chittagong Hill Tracts of erstwhile East Pakistan, now Bangladesh, Hajongs from Mymensingh district, Tibetans and Yobins, plus illegal immigrants from Bangladesh and Nepal – number one quarter of the total state population. The indigenous people of Arunachal want them out by September 30.
A bloodbath may be imminent after the expiry of the deadline. Since the September 7 rally organised by the AAPSU on the issue of Changlang district of Arunachal, which has the highest concentration of Chakma Buddhist refugees in the state...

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 Justice Delayed is Justice denied

 In India, judiciary is really an asset. It is the cornerstone upon which the liberty of the citizen in a democratic country rests upon. One of the most important factors which has made democracy survive in our nation in spite of its many handicaps, such as poverty, illiteracy, etc is the independence of judiciary and Rule of Law which withstood the test of time. Justice is the foundation of a democratic state. Courts are, but the agencies of the state to administer fair and impartial justice. One of the well settled cardinal principles of legal jurisprudence is that delay defeats justice. In case justice is delayed, it shall amount to denial of justice. So is the popular saying, “JUSTICE DELAYED IS JUSITICE DENIED.”

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Flashback June 1994 - Battle of Imphal: 50 Years Later

When you go back home, tell them of us, that for their tomorrow, we gave our today – thus went reverend John Croft, administering the service at the Imphal War Cemetery. A former British Army Major who saw action at Imphal, now well into his seventies, the pitch and conviction in his voice was impressive. He was at Imphal 50 years after one of the most intense conflicts of the Second World War where the Allied forces; British, Indians, Americans and Africans fought against the Japanese, a battle in which no quarter was asked for and none was given.

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Flashback April 1994 - Congress (I) leaders at war with Governor

They are wild with the Governor for branding them supporters of insurgents in reports to the centre. They want revival of the assembly, in suspended animation from December 31, 1993, and restoration of a popular ministry by April. The Governor is adamantly opposed to this; having condemned the entire senior political leadership, he is engaged in a search for younger, untainted leaders to project as a better alternative.

General Nayar, a former GOC of a specialist counter – insurgency division covering Manipur and Nagaland, of which he is also Governor now, runs the state administration along army lines. He depends on an inner circle of military, police and intelligence officers. He has little use of political leaders, and there are complaints of lack of access to him by public representatives and the local press.

“The Governor will not indulge politicians,” a union home ministry official here told Eastern Panorama. “They want the resumption of a ministry soon, but we won’t allow it,” the officer, a close adviser to the Governor, said. 


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Flashback March 1994

Pant Advices Proper Use of Resources

Mr. K. C. Pant, the chairman of the tenth Finance Commission, expressed his optimism about the development of the north eastern region. Stressing the need for better cooperation among the sister states of the north east, he said it was not only the historical or geographical link but also because of economic necessities.

Addressing a press conference at Shillong after meeting the Meghalaya Chief Minister Mr. S. C. Marak and some of his cabinet colleagues who placed the state’s demand to the Commission on February 25, Mr. Pant was critical about the functioning of the North Eastern Council. He stressed the need for reorientation of the NEC’s functioning and policies as it has failed to achieve its original objective of coordinated development of the north eastern region.


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